Native Americans Condemn The Dakota Pipeline, The Law Doesn’t

Native Americans Condemn The Dakota Pipeline, The Law Doesn’t

By Merrill Matthews, Washington Examiner, October 25, 2016

To hear environmental activists tell it, the Dakota Access Pipeline Project has run roughshod over Native American rights, heritage — and objections.

But to hear the federal judge presiding over the case tell it, the company building the pipeline and the U.S. Army Corps of Engineers have been both diligent and respectful in their efforts to address Native American concerns.

I’m with the judge on this one.

The pipeline will transport about 500,000 barrels of crude oil per day nearly 1,200 miles from the Bakken shale formation in northwest North Dakota through South Dakota and Iowa, arriving at refineries in Illinois.

About 99 percent of the pipeline is on private land and needs no federal permits. About half of the project is complete, and the pipeline company, Energy Transfer Partners, is proceeding apace on most of the remaining portions.

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